Honey Recipes Worth All the Buzz

Inspired by our upcoming gathering, Bee 2015, we’ve got a honey-themed post that’s as sweet as can be! Honey’s history is thousands of years long, and today’s beekeepers carefully tend to their hives in much the same way as those before them. Honeybees, pollinate 80 percent of all the fruits, vegetables, and seed crops grown in the United States. All of this flitting from blossom to blossom allows each hive to produce 60 to 100 pounds of honey each year. The different varieties of honey mentioned in these recipes are just a few of the variations available.sig honey jars 1200

Cooks and bakers love using honey as a sweetener. It’s all-natural, 25 percent sweeter than table sugar and never spoils – perfect for keeping on-hand and extremely versatile.

Bees work so hard to produce honey – shouldn’t we enjoy every drop? Try a few of these honey-touched recipes for a naturally sweet taste of nature.

HONEY BEE COOKIES

These adorable cookies pay tasty tribute to the humble honeybee.sig honey cookie 1143sig honey cookie 1143 close up

HONEY DRESSED CABBAGE SALAD

The combination of honey with the vinegar and mustard create a unique, just-sweet-enough taste for this side salad.salad_1

HONEY GLAZED CARROTS & PARSNIPS

Just a touch of honey, butter, and lime juice bring baked carrots and parsnips to life!sig honey carrots 1270

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Oil a rimmed sheet pan.

Transfer the vegetables to prepared pan and toss with the oil, salt and pepper and pour 1/4 cup water over vegetables. Bake 20 minutes; shake the pan or use a spatula to toss vegetables. Bake an additional 15 minutes.

In a small mixing bowl, combine the butter, honey, and lime juice and coat the vegetables with half of the glaze. Return the pan to the oven for an additional 10 minutes, or until the vegetables are soft. Toss vegetables with remaining glaze, re-season with salt and pepper if necessary and serve.

JUST A SPOONFUL OF HONEY

Next time, try a cheese course instead of a dessert. Aged cheese are often salty, tangy, and butty with sometimes-strong flavors. Drizzling a drop or two of honey will complement those flavors in a surprisingly subtle way.cheese

 

We hope you enjoy our Bee-inspired recipes and can’t wait to see all of our amazing Home Consultants at Bee 2015 right here in Dresden, Ohio!!sig honey honeycomb_1331